Pupil Premium Expenditure and Equality Information

Hothfield Pupil Premium Expenditure

Hothfield Junior School receives a Pupil Premium Grant for each child who is entitled to receive Free School Meals or who has been entitled over the last six years, and for any Looked After Children or adopted.

We are required to publish online information about how we have used the premium.

Hothfield’s Pupil Premium Grant for 2015-16 was £92 000.

The Governing Body of the school decided that this grant should be spent as follows:

- To support the cost of employing a Learning Mentor to work to support pupils to overcome barriers to learning resulting from their deprivation.

- To support children’s learning in the classroom by:

- ensuring that class sizes for pupil premium children are as low as possible in order that PP children can receive enhanced direct teacher intervention in their learning 

- ensuring that the pupil premium children have their needs clearly identified and their progress closely monitored through school.

- employing a Pupil Premium Intervention teacher to provide additional individual or small group tuition programmes for those Pupil Premium children who need a boost to their learning in order to reach their potential; for example small group reading, writing or maths tuition

- supporting one to one reading intervention programmes for pupil premium children who need additional support for reading

- funding maths intervention programmes for pupil premium children who need additional support for maths

- funding targeted teacher assistant support for learning in the classroom

-  To create a Special Fund for Pupil Premium children  and use this fund for:

- school trips, extracurricular activities, books to promote reading and to fund other opportunities to boost learning.

- individual musical instrument hire and tuition.

 We write to all parents whose children are entitled to free school meals or who have been entitled over the previous six years in September outlining the above support available.  We also assure parents that all matters regarding use of the Special Fund are treated with discretion and in confidence.

 

Pupil Premium Outcomes July 2016:

There were 20 children out of the 68 in the Year 6 cohort who were eligible for Pupil Premium funding - 30%.

 

Number of Pupil Premium children achieving the national standard

Number of Non-Pupil Premium children achieving the national standard

PP vs Non PP Gap

Maths

(national 70%)

16/20   80%

 

45/48   94%

 

-14%

Reading

(national 66%)

16/20   80%

35/48   73%

+7%

Writing

(national 74%)

18/20   90%

43/48   90%

0

GPS

(national 72%)

18/20   90%

37/48   77%

+13%

Reading, Writing and Maths Combined

(national 53%)

13/20   63%

34/48   70%

-7%

 

The Impact of our Pupil Premium spending 2015-16:

Cost

Provision Funded

Impact

Recommendations

Financial Year

15-16

£14,040

One to One reading – funding contributes to extra support assistant hours for children who enter Hothfield significantly below ARE in reading.  They regularly work on programmes such as ‘catch up literacy’.  Their reading age is monitored half termly.

Many children make rapid progress in terms of catching up months on reading age and are able to come off this reading support programme and work within the normal range for their class.  At Feb 5/8 pp children on the register had made more than expected progress

This programme should be continued in 16-17

£1,500

Open School for Reading- Support Assistant paid to work from 8:30am.  She records how many children arrive and report to school leadership

Many children across school use this – accessed by some of the pupil premium group who need extra reading but not all

DHT to discuss with HLTA  and make sure key children are targeted and invited

£12,300

Learning Mentor.  PP funding provides approx. 50% of the LM salary (as an HLTA).  Learning Mentor works with a variety of children either one to one or in groups on pastoral issues arising from emotional barriers to learning.  Also supporting some pp children in class and works with parents.   LM and DHT meet monthly to discuss which pp children to target.

The relationships built by LM enables many children to focus more and significantly catch up.

EGs: Child a in year 3 – LM group support. Attendance, focus and contact with parents now better leading to good progress – now working at ARE for all areas.

Child b in year 4 – one to one LM support for anxiety leading to greater confidence and improved progress – now ARE in writing and reading and close in maths.

Continue as vital to building positive links between home and school

£4,400

Booster Groups in year 6 for reading and maths – withdrawn in the pms to work with teacher funded by pp budget.  Some groups are after school

Recent assessments in year 6 show progress made towards ARE.  All children have progressed well since year 5 all except one are now working within the year 6 range, 2 at ‘dev’ level

This strategy has been effective in past years and this year’s cohort are progressing well with it. 

£1,360

Year 5 GPS intervention group – withdrawn in afternoons to work with teacher.

DHT to monitor progress of this group and consider effectiveness.  Group only been working since January.

DHT to report Summer 2016

£1,500

CBT: Counsellor specialising in boys mental health working with 5 children in year 6 with specific emotional barriers (eg bereavement; absent male role models at home)

Counsellor been in school since November, initially with just 3 boys.  All were behind in year 5.   They have all made good progress in year 6, although they are unlikely to reach ARE in all 3 areas, two of them could get there in reading and maths the other in reading

DHT to report Summer 2016 on effectiveness of this intervention

£11,320

Special Fund: funds music lessons, clubs, trips for pp children.  Milk and Y3 swimming. Uniform grants.

No obvious link with attainment, but important for equal opportunities

Limit to FSM from September due to funding reduction.  Plus a ‘hardship fund’ to be used case by case for residential trips.

£43,012

Keeping class sizes smaller – the equivalent of one full time teacher is funded by pp budget.

Comparative data does not show a significant narrowing of attainment gap pp to non pp

Benefits all children -  difficult to ensure specific pp benefit.  SLT should consider this one.

£10,000

One to one support for child in year 5 with significant emotional barriers 

Child has spent part of the week at behaviour unit from September and has not been able to access year 5 curriculum sufficiently to make progress.  Is becoming more integrated again now.

Support may need to continue for year 6

£4,000

Sundries including:

Beanstalk reading (trained volunteers), First News (resource), Taxi to behaviour unit for above child

Not all accessed exclusively by pupil premium children, although they are all accessed by some pupil premium children

DHT to evaluate effectiveness of Beanstalk reading

 

Our Pupil Premium Spending Plans for 2016-17:

Total Grant £82,420

Cost

Provision Funded

How will we measure the impact of this funding?

Financial Year

16-17

£14,040

One to One reading – funding contributes to extra support assistant hours for children who enter Hothfield significantly below ARE in reading.  They regularly work on programmes such as ‘catch up literacy’.  Children on the programme are assessed half termly to ensure they are making good progress in their reading.

For each individual child on Reading Programme – increases in Reading Age exceeds increase in actual age

£1,500

Open School for Reading- Support Assistant paid to work from 8:30am to enable Pupil Premium children to 'read for pleasure'.

Targeted Pupil Premium children attend and over year have read broad range of books for pleasure

£1,500

IDL Cloud. Reading and phonics intervention. Support assistant paid wok from 8:30am with targeted Pupil Premium children

For each individual child on Reading Programme – increases in Reading Age exceeds increase in actual age

£1,284

Beanstalk Reading Programme. Volunteer readers targeted at PP children.

For each individual child on Reading Programme – increases in Reading Age exceeds increase in actual age

£7,970

Learning Mentor.  PP funding provides approx. 50% of the LM salary.  Our Learning Mentor works with a variety of children either one to one or in groups on pastoral issues arising from emotional barriers to learning.  Also supporting some pp children in class and works with parents.   LM and DHT meet monthly to discuss which pp children to target.

PP children referred to Learning Mentor – achieving good progress in Reading, Writing and Maths

£500

Family Learning.  Each term the Learning Mentor organises family learning workshops, which are targeted at disadvantaged children

 

£16,000

Special Response Fund: A portion of the budget is kept available to fund a variety of activities to enrich learning and support school engagement for our most disadvantaged children.  These may include:

·         Trips and residentials

·         Uniform grants

·         School milk

·         Music lessons

·         After school clubs

We also use this money to fund specific provision such as counselling when the need arises.

All Pupil Premium children have full access to trips and residentials – and attend.

 

£ 33,666

*Staffing – by putting a sizeable portion of the funding into our staffing budget we enable the following:

·         Classes below 30 in y4,5 and 6 to enable teachers to spend more time with each Pupil Premium child

·         Intervention and booster provision provided by senior staff for on average 10 hours per week

2017: Pupil Premium children’s End of Key Stage 2 outcomes – progress and attainment matches that of non-pupil premium children nationally

£5,960

One to one support for child in year 5/6 with significant emotional barriers to learning

Individual child achieves positive progress score in 2017 Reading, Writing and Maths SATS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       
         

 

 

         

 

         

Equality Information

 

In line with our Public Sector Equality Duty arising from the Equality Act 2010, we are publishing here the steps we take to:

-  Eliminate discrimination and other conduct that is prohibited by the Equality Act 2010

-  Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not share it

-  Foster good relations across all characteristics.

 

Eliminating Discrimination:

Hothfield takes seriously its obligation to eliminate discrimination.  Our approach is outlined in our Equal Opportunities, Anti-Racism and Anti-Bullying Policies (all available to view from the Policies Section of the school website – www.hothfield.bradford.sch.uk )

 

 Fostering good relations across all characteristics

- Our Personal, Social and Health Education and Religious Education curriculum promotes understanding of a range of groups in our society.

- In addition, fostering good relationships between individuals and groups in school is a key part of our daily assemblies.

- In class, teachers will regularly use circle time to discuss specific incidents and issues that have arisen as we promote good relations and diffuse any tensions which may emerge.

- All racist incidents are logged and reported to governors and the local authority.  Remedial action is always taken.